616. Wedding Garden

The wedding garden, also called the Blue and White garden, is modeled after the work of Gertrude Jekyll. She was a famous gardener of the time period and the first nationally recognized female gardener. Jekyll radically changed the trends of gardening landscape. Her most popular color scheme was the Blue and White garden, which used a large variety of blues and blue-violets with the contrast of crisp white abundance. A third color, most often a pale green, was also added to make a subtle transition of flora down to plush carpeting of green grass. This was often done by using lambs ear with its pale green tones. She believed in layering plants by heights and color choices. Other flowers featured in the Blue and White garden are phlox, butterfly bushes, lilies, salvia, cleome, azalea, astilbe, delphiniums, hydrangeas, lavender, allium, and boxwood. Jekyll’s success broke ground for women to enter into the gardening field. Gardening allowed women an outlet for daily escape and purpose, and it became a passion of Elizabeth Beardsley. The fountain, located in the middle of the wedding garden is original to the property. The fountain adds an element of water which creates an easy and pleasant wandering area. Benches were also a necessary element to a formal garden, providing a clear place to rest among beauty.